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LAND PREPARATION STEPS

by Albert Makendenge

The first and most crucial step when it comes to cultivation is that of land preparation. Land preparation is the process of setting up the soils for crops to grow. The reason why well prepared land holds great significance in agriculture is that it regulates weed growth and provides a fertile soil mass for transplanting.

Land preparation is done to enhance the successful establishment of the young offshoots or the tissue cultured plants that are obtained from nurseries. This process also helps in recycling the nutrients of the plants and provides an ideal soil texture for direct seeding.

The basic process that goes into land preparation is tilling and harrowing. Tilling refers to the technique of preparing the soil that requires mechanical agitation or movement of some sort that may include manual equipment, machinery or automated tools. As a farmer it a good idea to wait a few weeks before actually cultivating the freshly tilled land. The first layer that is ploughed and made ready is often referred to as the primary tillage. This opens the soil for aerating and boosts the growth of micro-organisms that improve the fertility of the soil.

The second step is harrowing which is also known as secondary ploughing. This involves breaking down the soil into smaller, minute particles. It is often accompanied by rototilling which further smoothens the density of the soil which is suitable to make a good seedbed for the crops.

There are different stages in land preparation; each more significant and strenuous than the other. The marriage of these smaller steps together become the base for a healthy harvest. The steps required in the preparation of land involve clearing and weeding the field, pre-irrigation, first ploughing or tilling, harrowing, flooding and lastly levelling.

With the right equipment, you will surely be able to harvest a great yield, provided that you get all the other agronomic practices right. Visit our blog on https://www.vamudhumeni.org/blog to learn more about agronomic practices from our experts.

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